Welcome to George Peabody Library's Wunderkammer!

From dandies in danger to the lusty dramas of educated fleas, the George Peabody Library proves that the past was indeed STRANGE! Visit us in Baltimore (don't worry, in addition to the strange things depicted here, we also have plenty of old and rare and classy books, too).

Hours: Tuesday-Thursday 9am -5pm; Friday 9-3

Address: 17 East Mount Vernon Place Baltimore, MD 21202

Phone: 410-234-4943

Libguide: http://bit.ly/g1UsTk

Email: hherr1@jhu.edu

Early 19th century French fashion plates prove that awkward poses are always en vogue! Coy shoe adjustment! Stylish headaches! Vapors onset!  Plus, what’s up with the arms?  It’s like the vintage version of a photoshop of horrors!

Sacrebleu! Just what happened at the French cafe? Surely, Picasso and Apollinaire must be unleashing some sort of mayhem in the name of Art, or maybe just maybe, the evil Bonnet gang is once again to blame!
From our kickin’ collection of crime capers at the George Peabody Library!  Why not visit us in Baltimore and read them all?

Sacrebleu! Just what happened at the French cafe? Surely, Picasso and Apollinaire must be unleashing some sort of mayhem in the name of Art, or maybe just maybe, the evil Bonnet gang is once again to blame!


From our kickin’ collection of crime capers at the George Peabody Library!  Why not visit us in Baltimore and read them all?

A Constipated Economy?
Binding waste (hah!) from a French reference work on economics.  The binding waste is from an advertisement for Jubol, an amazing cleaner of the intestines and the tongue; indeed, the product promises to fully re-educate one’s intestines.  Hello digestive PhD!Call No.: 330 .L621Location: George Peabody Library

A Constipated Economy?

Binding waste (hah!) from a French reference work on economics.  The binding waste is from an advertisement for Jubol, an amazing cleaner of the intestines and the tongue; indeed, the product promises to fully re-educate one’s intestines.  Hello digestive PhD!

Call No.: 330 .L621
Location: George Peabody Library

It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s a Frenchman with his Flying Horse!
Us silly Americans have to make do with silly talking horses like Mr. Ed, but the French get flying horses! Believe it or not, but there actually was a noted 18th century French balloonist by the name of Pierre Testu-Brissy who reportedly took over 50 hot air balloon rides with his horse!From:  Les Animaux Savants, ou, Exercises des Chevaux de MM. Franconi, du cerf Coco, du cerf Azor, de l’elephant Baba, des serins hollandais, du singe militaire. Paris: P. Didot, 1816.
Location: George Peabody Library

It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s a Frenchman with his Flying Horse!

Us silly Americans have to make do with silly talking horses like Mr. Ed, but the French get flying horses! Believe it or not, but there actually was a noted 18th century French balloonist by the name of Pierre Testu-Brissy who reportedly took over 50 hot air balloon rides with his horse!

From:  Les Animaux Savants, ou, Exercises des Chevaux de MM. Franconi, du cerf Coco, du cerf Azor, de l’elephant Baba, des serins hollandais, du singe militaire. Paris: P. Didot, 1816.

Location: George Peabody Library

Meet the French Trojan Horse … That’s Actually a Cow!This totally tubular illustration is from a rather odd book called Les Animaux Savants (1816) which details the animal-related adventures of a family in France.  The book is really strange, but appears to  be using weird animal stories as a way to make social or even political commentary.
This illustrations depicts an artificial cow for the lazy hunter to hide in.  After all, everyone knows cows aren’t scared of birds, so just dress up as a cow and shoot the birds as they endeavor to meet their bovine  neighbor.  Freaky!  It’s almost as if the French foresaw all those Chick-Fil-A ads!
Call No.:791.8 B1 DUODECIMO
Location: George Peabody Library

Meet the French Trojan Horse … That’s Actually a Cow!
This totally tubular illustration is from a rather odd book called Les Animaux Savants (1816) which details the animal-related adventures of a family in France.  The book is really strange, but appears to  be using weird animal stories as a way to make social or even political commentary.

This illustrations depicts an artificial cow for the lazy hunter to hide in.  After all, everyone knows cows aren’t scared of birds, so just dress up as a cow and shoot the birds as they endeavor to meet their bovine  neighbor.  Freaky!  It’s almost as if the French foresaw all those Chick-Fil-A ads!

Call No.:791.8 B1 DUODECIMO

Location: George Peabody Library