Welcome to George Peabody Library's Wunderkammer!

From dandies in danger to the lusty dramas of educated fleas, the George Peabody Library proves that the past was indeed STRANGE! Visit us in Baltimore (don't worry, in addition to the strange things depicted here, we also have plenty of old and rare and classy books, too).

Hours: Tuesday-Thursday 9am -5pm; Friday 9-3

Address: 17 East Mount Vernon Place Baltimore, MD 21202

Phone: 410-234-4943

Libguide: http://bit.ly/g1UsTk

Email: hherr1@jhu.edu


What with the recent recovery of the stolen Codex Calixtinus and arrest of the people involved in the theft of such an unique and beautiful manuscript, we’ve had issues of crime and punishment on our mind.  And wouldn’t you know that the Peabody Library has oodles of material of the punitive kind!
Let’s say you’ve had the misfortune of committing a crime in ancient China. One of the punishments you might have to endure is the application of limes on your poor eyes! Now that’s got to sting…
Description from the Book:  A small quantity of unslacked lime is put into pieces of cotton cloth, and closely applied to the organs of sight.
 Title:  The punishments of China: illustrated by twenty-two engravings: with explanations in English and French.
 Call number:  343.2 M399 QUARTO
Location: George Peabody Library

What with the recent recovery of the stolen Codex Calixtinus and arrest of the people involved in the theft of such an unique and beautiful manuscript, we’ve had issues of crime and punishment on our mind.  And wouldn’t you know that the Peabody Library has oodles of material of the punitive kind!

Let’s say you’ve had the misfortune of committing a crime in ancient China. One of the punishments you might have to endure is the application of limes on your poor eyes! Now that’s got to sting…

Description from the Book: A small quantity of unslacked lime is put into pieces of cotton cloth, and closely applied to the organs of sight.

Title: The punishments of China: illustrated by twenty-two engravings: with explanations in English and French.

Call number: 343.2 M399 QUARTO

Location: George Peabody Library


It’s time for Funny Friday! Are you ready for one of the best jokes ever? Here’s a major hoot for you:
Wifey: “Go back and fight him, you coward.”Hubby: “But he’s given me two black eyes already.”Wifey: “Well, he can’t give you anymore, can he?”
Call No.: 818 .5202 B4644 1929Location: George Peabody Library

It’s time for Funny Friday! Are you ready for one of the best jokes ever? Here’s a major hoot for you:

Wifey: “Go back and fight him, you coward.”
Hubby: “But he’s given me two black eyes already.”
Wifey: “Well, he can’t give you anymore, can he?”

Call No.: 818 .5202 B4644 1929
Location: George Peabody Library

This image shows a book that is a part of the Dorothy McIlvain Scott Collection, which is composed of lovely exemplars of fine binding and fore-edge painting. This particular book has a painted fore-edge showing Pooh & his friends! Aren’t they so cute?Milne, A. A. The House at Pooh Corner. London, 1928.Call No.: 823 .912 M6351 1928Location: The George Peabody Library

This image shows a book that is a part of the Dorothy McIlvain Scott Collection, which is composed of lovely exemplars of fine binding and fore-edge painting. This particular book has a painted fore-edge showing Pooh & his friends! Aren’t they so cute?

Milne, A. A. The House at Pooh Corner. London, 1928.
Call No.: 823 .912 M6351 1928
Location: The George Peabody Library

A beautifully captured photo of our library, taken on June 2007. Look how pretty it is! [Credits for the image go to photographer N. Barker.]

A beautifully captured photo of our library, taken on June 2007. Look how pretty it is! [Credits for the image go to photographer N. Barker.]

This image shows a book that is a part of the Dorothy McIlvain Scott Collection, which is composed of lovely exemplars of fine binding and fore-edge painting. This particular book has a painted fore-edge showing Pooh & his friends!
Look! It’s Tigger, frolicking in the grass! Milne, A. A. The House at Pooh Corner. London, 1928.Call No.: 823 .912 M6351 1928Location: The George Peabody Library

This image shows a book that is a part of the Dorothy McIlvain Scott Collection, which is composed of lovely exemplars of fine binding and fore-edge painting. This particular book has a painted fore-edge showing Pooh & his friends!

Look! It’s Tigger, frolicking in the grass!

Milne, A. A. The House at Pooh Corner. London, 1928.
Call No.: 823 .912 M6351 1928
Location: The George Peabody Library

Another amazing shot of Peabody from photographer N. Barker, June 2007.

Another amazing shot of Peabody from photographer N. Barker, June 2007.

Dig this swanky Peabody Library view from an eccentric swanky fella!
paulmathews:

Today, I got to climb to the sixth floor of the George Peabody Library and look down over a space that has inspired and replenished me for much of my life. I first saw the GPL when I was a child.  I took my doctoral exams there.  The Conservatory used the space for the reception the year I graduated.  And during the course of the school year, I frequently duck into the GPL to collect my thoughts.  A quiet room in a music school?  It’s essential.  And what a quiet room!  There is something incongruous about such a large room with so little sound. 
Thanks to the kind folks who run the GPL, who greatly overestimated the significance of my title, I got to stand at the top of “the cathedral of books.”   And my best efforts notwithstanding, I little resembled Josh Charles, who is pictured there in a recent feature in Baltimore Sun Magazine. 
But I’m foolishly optimistic:  Peabody’s not finished with me yet. 

Dig this swanky Peabody Library view from an eccentric swanky fella!

paulmathews:

Today, I got to climb to the sixth floor of the George Peabody Library and look down over a space that has inspired and replenished me for much of my life. I first saw the GPL when I was a child.  I took my doctoral exams there.  The Conservatory used the space for the reception the year I graduated.  And during the course of the school year, I frequently duck into the GPL to collect my thoughts.  A quiet room in a music school?  It’s essential.  And what a quiet room!  There is something incongruous about such a large room with so little sound. 

Thanks to the kind folks who run the GPL, who greatly overestimated the significance of my title, I got to stand at the top of “the cathedral of books.”   And my best efforts notwithstanding, I little resembled Josh Charles, who is pictured there in a recent feature in Baltimore Sun Magazine. 

But I’m foolishly optimistic:  Peabody’s not finished with me yet.